Telehealth Essentials: The Biomechanics of Virtual Connection

Anonymous
5 days agoApril 27, 2020
Thanks for these useful tips
Gregory Quinn, CPC, CHONC, CPPM
5 days agoApril 27, 2020
Dr. Beeson, 

I couldn't agree more with you.  As someone who has dealt with customer service all my life, I know that tone of voice is very key when speaking with a patient over the phone.  Even without video.  This is all a new frontier and we need to remember and apply the lesson we were taught when speaking in person to speaking via video.  These were very useful tips.   Thank you.
Amy Scanlan
5 days agoApril 27, 2020
Thank you for this. I've been struck how exhausted I am after a day of virtual visits vs in person visits, and this video helps me to understand a bit better - we have fewer tools to rely on to create connection during these visits, and so they take on greater importance and focus.....
Samuel Semegn
5 days agoApril 27, 2020
Thanks Dr. Beeson. I found it very valuable to have great video session with my patients.
Louise Walsh
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
Our Video Visits are only 10 minutes long, so I do tend to "jump in" quicker than usual (less small talk).  but honestly, I'm going over my 10 minutes because it feels impossible to get the information I need in such a short window of time.  Good to know about letting the patient know what I'm doing when I'm looking off screen.  I didn't even think it would be something that would be upsetting to a patient
Fernando Garcia
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
These are all good points; however, they are no different of what should occur during in-person visits.  The lack of other shared experience in-person allows the patient to narrow their focus on the provider, thus the greater need to focus on some bad habits.  This experience should help with in-person visits as well.  It's a muscle we exercise - the more we do so the stronger it gets.
Felecia S. Waddleton-Willis
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
As always, I appreciate any useful tips and trade secrets that may improve the patient satisfaction during Virtual/Video Visits. As a member of the 'pilot program' for this invaluable tele-health tool, I am pleased with receiving the professional pearls and appreciate it tremendously.
Diane Boykin
4 days agoApril 27, 2020

Diane Boykin
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
00:00:00
Thanks for the helpful tips.  I really enjoy the video visit because it allows me to feel more connected with my patients as well.  So the benefit is for patients as well as physicians.
Christa Maruster
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
00:00:00
Love this tip! It's so common sense, yet not particularly intuitive. We have to consciously to do things for them to be perceived as effortless.
Anonymous
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
Great tips- I also "wave hello" and "good bye" since we cant shake hands. (pediatrics). I also thank them for trying the new e-visit with me as we are learning together.
Michael Amster MD
3 days agoApril 28, 2020
Great idea!! I love this.  Virtual fist bump
Therese
4 days agoApril 27, 2020
Totally agree posture sends more information then our words; I do tell Pt "just like in the office I am looking up your labs a on a second screen" or " let look for the x-ray report on my second screen". I also for-warn I am hanging up by waving good bye; as well as thanking them for agreeing to met with his new technology of the 21st century!
Michael Amster MD
3 days agoApril 28, 2020
I have 2 screens and I always tell the patient in advance if I look away its because I'm looking at a 2nd screen
Jeff Merrill
3 days agoApril 28, 2020
Really appreciate these tips.  To better connect with and to help my younger peds patients feel more comfortable with the video visits, I have added a few stuffed animal friends to my team - Leo the Lion and Brea the Bunny - the kids really perk up when they see my friends on screen.
Lawrence Hecker
3 days agoApril 29, 2020
Small talk is key. I learn more about patients in this setting. Reassuring patients is a key ingredient to the visit
Medical Society Director
2 days agoApril 29, 2020
Great information. When you spoke about body language/posture and showed the picture of the physician leaning back, hands behind head, it reminded me of something I read years ago about that pose. When CEOs or other business leaders use that pose (especially men) it is seen as a sign of overconfidence and power posturing. "It displays a condescending and disdainful attitude towards others," according to one author.
Victor Reyes MD
1 day agoApril 30, 2020
Could not agree more with the tips. 
Small talk can include a hopeful message of seeing them again, after things get better.
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